Technology and I.P.

  • September 11, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University School of Law

     

    In 1996, Congress became concerned that excessive liability would threaten the free flow of information over the Internet. To protect the Internet from this risk, Congress passed 47 USC § 230 (Section 230), which eliminates (with limited exceptions) the liability of online services for publishing third party content.
     
    By any measure, Section 230 has been a remarkable success. Think about the Internet services you use daily, such as Google, Facebook, YouTube, Wikipedia, Twitter, eBay, Snapchat, LinkedIn, and Yelp. All of them publish third party content, and all of them have flourished because of Section 230’s immunity. Section 230 also promotes competitive markets by reducing entry costs. New entrants can challenge the marketplace leaders without having to match the incumbents’ editorial investments or incurring fatal liability risks.
     
  • July 24, 2017
    Guest Post

    by Gigi B. Sohn*, Fellow, Georgetown Law Institute for Tech & Society, Open Society Foundations and Mozilla and Kevin Werbach, Associate Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

    *Sohn previously served as Counselor to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler from Nov. 2013 - Dec. 2016. 

    **This post is part of ACSblog’s Symposium on Regulatory Rollback

    The Open Internet (or “net neutrality”) rules adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 2015 were the Obama administration’s most significant achievement in communications regulation. They were among the first rules the Trump administration targeted following the 2016 election. In May, the Trump FCC began a rulemaking proceeding to repeal them. It also rejected the legal authority in which the rules are grounded, and failed to recommend anything in their place.

    The Open Internet rules prohibit broadband Internet Service Providers (“ISPs) like Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, and Charter, from discriminating against or favoring any content, applications or services on the Internet. Among other things, the rules specifically prohibit ISPs from blocking or throttling, and prohibit ISPs from extracting fees in exchange for faster or better quality delivery to the consumer (“paid prioritization”).

  • January 22, 2016
    Guest Post
    by Daniel Nazer, Staff Attorney and Mark Cuban Chair to End Stupid Patents, Electronic Frontier Foundation
     
    *This post is part of the ACSblog Symposium on Patent Law Reform.
     
    If you got sued for patent infringement in 2015, chances are pretty good that you were sued in the Eastern District of Texas. An astonishing 2,514 patent lawsuits – or 44 percent of the national total – were filed there this year. Over 1,500 of these cases were filed before a single judge: Judge Rodney Gilstrap. While patent suits have clustered in Eastern Texas for nearly a decade, this year saw an unprecedented concentration. This extreme forum shopping raises important questions about procedural fairness and due process.
     
    Why are so many patent cases filed in the Eastern District of Texas? It’s not for the barbecue. And it’s not because the remote, largely rural district is a technology hub. Rather, it’s because local rules and practices make the district attractive to patent plaintiffs. More specifically, local practices make the district very attractive to companies – known as patent trolls – whose sole business model is to buy patents and sue.
     
    For example, the Eastern District of Texas judges that most frequently hear patent cases have standing orders requiring parties to submit letter briefs asking permission to file for summary judgment. This makes it harder for defendants to avoid a costly trial. A recent study found that judges in the district granted only 18 percent of motions for summary judgment on the basis of patent invalidity. (In contrast, the grant rate nationwide was 31 percent.) Considering that this study did not include cases where the defendant wasn’t even permitted to file for summary judgment in the first place, it follows that the true grant rate in the Eastern District of Texas is even lower.
     
    In addition to the inconvenience of litigating in a distant forum, local rules make discovery more expensive. The local discovery order in patent cases requires parties to automatically begin producing documents before the other side even requests them. This practice ‒ which, in EFF’s view, is not consistent with the Federal Rules ‒ particularly burdens patent defendants. That is because unlike shell company patent trolls, operating companies need to search and produce a huge volume of documents. These burdensome discovery practices create pressure to settle weak cases and thus attract trolls to the district.
  • January 21, 2016
    Guest Post

    by Colleen V. Chien, Associate Professor of Law, Santa Clara University School of Law, former White House Senior Advisor on intellectual property and innovation; and Michael Risch, Professor of Law, Villanova University School of Law

    *This post is part of the ACSblog Symposium on Patent Law Reform.

    Although patent reform is not a partisan issue, it has divided those who write and think about the patent system for a living. Earlier this year, 51 law and economics professors wrote a letter to Congress pointing to the “large and increasing body of evidence” supporting legislative patent reform. Weeks later, 40 professors shot back, expressing “deep concerns with the many flawed studies.” We aren’t saying who was right, because one of us signed the second letter and the other authored a number of the contested studies. One of us joined the Obama administration to support patent reform, the other opposes it.

    But there is one issue upon which we — and most stakeholders — agree: The staggering concentration of patent cases in just a few federal district courts is bad for the patent system. We believe that changing where patent lawsuits can be filed will solve many of the problems in the debate.

    Last year, more patent cases (44 percent to be exact) were initiated in the Eastern District of Texas than anywhere else, as the following chart shows.

                                 

    Under a 1990 federal circuit court ruling, defendants can be sued in any district where they sell their products, which is basically anywhere. According to a forthcoming paper by Professors John Allison (University of Texas at Austin), Mark Lemley (Stanford) and David Schwartz (Northwestern), non-practicing entities — pejoratively referred to as “patent trolls” — bring a majority of the patent cases decided in the Eastern District of Texas. The issue is not limited to trolls, however: Kraft Foods is a plaintiff in Delaware in a current case on this issue.

  • January 19, 2016
    Guest Post

    by Kali Murray, Associate Professor of Law, Marquette University Law School

    *This post is part of the ACSblog Symposium on Patent Law Reform.

    Recently, I was informed that I needed to stop using the words “patent reform” in my work. Such words, it was explained to me, had become too contested. The words “patent reform” had become a political tool used by one side or the other in the fierce debate over how to effectively police the specter of patent trolls, whether through congressional reform or state and federal administrative efforts. It seems to me, though, that these words—“patent reform”—are too important to give up to one side or another, and so, this is an attempt to give new meaning to these words going forward.

    What then are the steps that must be taken if we are to give meaning to the words “patent reform?” First, any patent reform needs to take into account what I and my co-author Erica George have referred to as the dual objectives of the patent system. Our constitutional patent regime seeks not only to incentivize the economic activity of a patent claimant but also to protect the preconditions for creative activity that serve as the basic building blocks of scientific inquiry and information exchange. We call this the patent bargain: The patent owner gains a property right in the information in exchange for disclosure of the patent to the public. Too often though, when we speak about patent law, we value the rights of the patent claimant over the right of the public to have access and use to the information contained within the patent.

    Recognizing these dual objectives would center patent reform in two ways. Initially, if we see that patent reform serves democratic values other than the economic goals of innovation, it may limit the ongoing deterioration of our current debate into a contest between different interest groups. As we have seen within the context of copyright law, this can lead to significant industry capture that can harm coherence and continuity of the current law. Additionally, honoring the dual objectives of the patent system may also help to center the debate in progressive values of transparency, access, and equity. I object, for instance, to the current legislation before Congress that imposes significant attorney fees in patent litigation because it may dissuade nonprofits and public interest groups from engaging in litigation to challenge undesirable patents. Such choices would significantly undermine access to different avenues of patent litigation, thus undermining the dual objectives embodied in our patent bargain.